Business Courses Pdf Course List Cataloghcccedu

Business courses pdf course list cataloghcccedu

File Name: index.pdf

File Size: 1,000.99 KB

File Type: Application/pdf

Category: Business

Uploaded: 7 months

Last Modified: 1 year

Status: Available

Last checked: 23 days ago!

Summary

Courses
COURSES
PDF COURSE LIST
ACCOUNTING
ACC 241 Intermediate Accounting II 4.0 UNITS
This course is a continuation of Accounting 240, Intermediate Accounting I. It covers Long-Lived Assets, Long-Term Liabilities, Stockholders'
Equity, Financial Statement Preparation and Analysis

ACC 121 Principles of Accounting I 3.0 UNITS
Previous accounting knowledge is not required. The course covers the entire accounting cycle from analysis of transactions, journalizing,
posting, worksheets, preparation of financial statements, closing entries, post-closing trail balance and reversing entries. Also introduced
are the accounting principles as applied in the United States (GAAP). Emphasis is placed on practical applications of accounting procedures
as well as conceptual comprehension of accounting principles used in both service- and product-related businesses. Led by faculty, lab
hours are used to reinforce topics covered in lecture. Students also participate in group work and complete projects

ACC 211 Computerized Accounting 3.0 UNITS
An introduction to the construction and implementation of computerized accounting systems used to accurately document, record and
summarize financial information. The course emphasizes how such systems safeguard the assets of the client and ensure the integrity
of the reporting system. Students will use source documents as a means of developing an information base. Students will design special
journals and voucher systems as a means of facilitating recording functions and they will also develop a subsidiary ledger for purposes of
recording secondary information. The course will conclude with students operating a fully-integrated computerized general ledger system
that may be applied to the accounting needs of individuals, organizations and small business enterprises. Students will also independently
complete computer laboratory projects using specialized computer software

ACC 221 Principles of Accounting II 3.0 UNITS
Continuation of Principles of Accounting I, emphasizing accounting applications for partnerships, corporations, and manufacturing. A
survey of cost accounting and budgetary procedures including the preparation and use of financial information needed for management
planning and decision-making. Led by faculty, lab hours are used to reinforce topics covered in lecture. Students also participate in group
work and complete projects

ACC 224 Federal Taxation 3.0 UNITS
A study of Federal Income Tax law and its practical application in the preparation of tax forms for the individual, partnerships, and
corporations

ACC 226 Auditing 3.0 UNITS
This course will cover the theory of auditing principles and standards employed by the external and internal auditor. These standards
are based on generally- accepted auditing standards and the related literature of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants

Emphasis is on Auditing procedures

ACC 228 Cost Accounting 3.0 UNITS
Examines cost accounting information systems; cost of materials, labor and manufacturing expenses, standards, and cost controls; direct
costing and cost analysis

ACC 240 Intermediate Accounting I 4.0 UNITS
This course presents a balanced approach to the treatment of conceptual and procedural problems in accounting. The course explains
the rationale behind business transactions and addresses the accounting and reporting of those transactions. The course will include
discussions of the latest developments in the accounting profession and practice

ADVANCED MANUFACTURING
ADM 201 Materials Science 3.0 UNITS
This course is an introduction to materials science. Topics include physical and mechanical properties of materials including metal alloys,
plastics, rubbers, ceramics, glass, and composites. Students learn standard techniques for measuring mechanical properties including
American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D638 Tensile Test, ASTM D2240 Hardness Test, ASTM D5630 Ash Test, ASTM D3418
Melting Point and Crystallization Point Test, ASTM D256 Impact TEST and ASTM D648 Heat Deflection Test. Hands-on laboratory sessions
reinforce topics covered during lecture

ADM 120 Manufacturing Processes 3.0 UNITS
Catalog Course Description: This course covers the basic processing methods for metals and woods. Topics include hand tools and power
tools, machining, joining, shaping, bending, surface preparation and finishing, Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) and blueprint

Courses 1
Courses
ADM 230 Plastic Manufacturing 3.0 UNITS
This course covers the basic processing methods for plastics and rubbers. Topics include an introduction to plastics, injection molding,
compression molding, blow molding, thermoforming, compound extrusion, pipe extrusion, film casting, film blowing, additives and fillers,
and color matching. This course meets two hours per week for lecture, as well as an additional two hours of lab per week where concepts
introduced during lecture are reinforced

ADM 231 Computer Numeric Control 3.0 UNITS
This course introduces students to basic Computer Numeric Control (CNC) Mill and Lathe operation. Concepts to be covered include
Pendant operation, basic G and M coding, and tool setup. This course prepares students for the National Institute for Metalworking Skills
(NIMS) CNC Milling Operator certificate test. The concepts covered in lab reinforce concepts covered in lecture

ADM 182 Wood Science 3.0 UNITS
Catalog Course Description: This course familiarizes the student with the basic structure, anatomy, moisture relationships, and
deterioration process of the various woods used in U.S. commercial manufacturing

ADM 232 Welding 4.0 UNITS
This course introduces the students to the fundamentals of welding. It provides the student with opportunities for training in Shielded
Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding. This course prepares students for the Certified Welder Test accredited
by the American Welding Society

ADM 241 Manufacturing Design 3.0 UNITS
This course is an overview of the manufacturing industry. Topics include organization structure, lean manufacturing, regulations,
environmental and safety concerns, quality assurance, and modern manufacturing. There will be two field trips visiting nearby
manufacturers. Students will also work on Capstone projects. Concepts discussed during lectures are reinforced during laboratory hours

ADM 282 Machine Processes Architectural Woodwork 3.0 UNITS
This course covers the processing methods for woodworking. Students will learn to set up and properly use woodworking equipment
including Gang Ripsaw, Shapers, Sliding Table Saw, Double Miter Saw, Wide Belt Sander, Dovetailer, Band Saw, Pocket Screw-Machine,
Planer, and Jointer. Concepts discussed during lectures are reinforced during laboratory hours

ADM 185 Fund. Architectural Manufacturing 3.0 UNITS
This course covers the basic processing methods for woodworking. Students will learn to safely use hand tools and power tools, machining,
joining, shaping, bending, surface preparation and finishing, Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) and blueprint. Concepts discussed during
lectures are reinforced during laboratory hours. Students may not receive credits for both ADM120 and this course

ADM 240 Robotics 3.0 UNITS
This course addresses autonomous control of robots for woodworking applications and machine learning. The course covers a variety of
multidisciplinary topics necessary to understand the fundamentals of designing, building, and programming robots. Students lean to write
their own programs and build their own robot prototypes using a hands-on approach to engineering design. Each topic is presented in
the format of two-hour lectures immediately followed by a two-hour laboratory where students will apply the concepts discussed during
the lecture

ADM 256 CNC for Woodworking 3.0 UNITS
This course introduces students to basic Computer Numeric Control (CNC) Mill, Router, and Lathe operation. Concepts to be covered
include woodworking router operation, basic G and M coding and tool setup. Concepts discussed during lectures are reinforced during
laboratory hours. This course prepares students for the NJ DOE Recognized CTE End-of-Program Assessments, which involves the CNC
skills. Students may not receive credits for both ADM231 and this course

AMERICAN STUDIES
AMS 135 Introduction to American Studies 3.0 UNITS
This course provides an introductory overview to the field of American Studies. It seeks to answer the question, ?What does it mean to
be an American?? It integrates several disciplines, taking a holistic view of the American perspective. The goal is to introduce students to
the ideas and theories most closely linked to the field. These include topics in American history, philosophy, cultural studies, art, literature,
political science and international relations

ANTHROPOLOGY
ANT 101 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 3.0 UNITS
This course is an introduction to the anthropological study of the nature and functions of human culture. The course examines how
different cultures respond to certain needs expressed by religion, art, social organization and general patterns of life. The cultural diversity
of humankind is emphasized

2 Courses
Courses
ANT 102 Introduction to Physical Anthropology 3.0 UNITS
In this course, students examine evidence for the origin and evolution of humankind from our earliest ancestors to modern populations

This course incorporates theories and data from a host of anthropological, biological and archaeological expertise and seeks to explain
how and why human beings developed and adapted all over the world

COMPUTER ART
ARC 105 Intro to Computer Arts 3.0 UNITS
This course provides an introductory level exploration of the Macintosh Operating System; print, interactive and time-based graphics
applications; typography; and color theory for print, web and video. Students will also learn conceptual, historical, and theoretical aspects
of art and design made with digital media. 3 hours lecture/1 hour lab
ARC 106 Digital Imaging 3.0 UNITS
This course provides students with the necessary knowledge and techniques for the creation and manipulation of photographic digital
images using digital cameras and scanners for input, Photoshop for editing and manipulation, and photo quality inkjet printers for output

Assignments and discussions address critical issues in contemporary digital practices

ARC 115 3D Digital Design for Fabrication 3.0 UNITS
The course provides students with the foundation knowledge of the technical and creative aspects of digital three-dimensional design that
will allow students to conceive, edit and fabricate objects using 3D scanners, 3D modeling software and 3D printers

ARC 107 Print Design 3.0 UNITS
This course will provide students with the necessary technical, conceptual and aesthetic knowledge to create effective designs for print that
comprehensively communicate ideas through visual graphic form. Preparation of photos, graphics and text for use in layout and design will
be thoroughly addressed. The use of typography and its integration with images to communicate specific ideas and content to a desired
audience will also be a main focus of the course. Adobe InDesign, Illustrator and Photoshop software applications will be utilized

ARC 109 Interactive/Web Design 3.0 UNITS
This course will provide students with the necessary conceptual knowledge of the visual aesthetics of interactive design. Students will
design websites that use intuitive visual layouts and interactivity to communicate information and ideas to a specific audience. The course
also covers the basic technical skills required to prepare images and content for the web. The Adobe Dreamweaver software application
will be utilized in this course

ARC 201 Digital Video 3.0 UNITS
Through lectures, demonstrations and project-based assignments, students will acquire knowledge of digital video preproduction,
production and postproduction by studying treatment and storyboard design, lighting techniques, shot composition using high-definition
video cameras, editing video and sound, creating title sequences, compositing video, compressing data, and publishing digital video

Industry standard desktop video and audio editing software applications will be utilized. This course will also examine the role digital video
and moving images have played in contemporary art, documentation, and mass media. Equipment will be supplied

ARC 202 Digital Animation 3.0 UNITS
This course provides students with the necessary knowledge and skills to create dynamic two-dimensional digital animation and motion
graphics. Students will acquire the analytical and critical thinking skills required to conceive, produce and publish original digital animations
utilizing industry standard software applications. Students will use storyboarding, rotoscoping, animated typography, original character
development and scene production techniques. 2D animation fundamentals as well as concepts of motion and continuity will be thoroughly
covered in this course. This course will also briefly introduce 3D compositing and interactivity. Equipment will be supplied

ARC 280 Computer Arts Portfolio and Presentation 3.0 UNITS
Computer Arts Portfolio and Presentation provides student artists and designers with the knowledge to meet both their educational and
professional goals. Students will prepare their work to be presented to both future clients and employers as well as for admission to senior
academic institutions. Students will acquire conceptual knowledge and technical skills to effectively present their work in many formats
including as a printed portfolio, a web-based portfolio, a video reel for animation and video works, an interactive video disk, in an exhibition
setting and as a multimedia presentation to an audience. The course will culminate with an exhibition and presentation of students? work

Computer Arts Portfolio and Presentation is the Capstone course for the A.F.A. Studio Arts ? Computer Arts Option

ART
ART 125 Art History II 3.0 UNITS
Art History II traces the development and evolution of techniques and styles from the 15th to the 20th century. This course will cover major
movements of art including the Baroque, Rococo, Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Post Impressionism, Dada, Surrealism,
and Modernism. Students follow art into the twenty first-century, and view how social, technological, and spiritual changes affected its
development

Courses 3
Courses
ART 103 Two Dimensional Design 3.0 UNITS
Two-dimensional design introduces the organization of visual elements on a two-dimensional plane. The elements of art and concepts
of design such as composition, perspective, color and other art elements will be examined through lectures, demonstrations and related
studio problems for the students to explore and solve. Techniques for handling materials will be developed

ART 106 Drawing I 3.0 UNITS
This is an introductory course in basic drawing skills. Emphasis is on drawing from direct observation or life with a variety of traditional
drawing materials and techniques. It includes an introduction to various systems of drawing - e.g., linear perspective and principles of
chiaroscuro

ART 107 Painting I 3.0 UNITS
This course is an introductory studio (laboratory) course in basic painting skills and techniques. Focus will be upon the use of paint to create
fine art and explore individual creative potential. Emphasis will be on control and proficiency in handling the medium of paint and learning
the fundamental painting techniques. This course is designed for beginners with little or no experience of painting. Proficiency in drawing
is beneficial but not critical to successful completion of the course

ART 113 Three Dimensional Design 3.0 UNITS
Student artists will learn to create practical and theoretical three- dimensional objects using a variety of techniques and materials. Through
the study of nature and geometry, students will learn to use line, plane, mass, volume and surface

ART 114 Color Theory 3.0 UNITS
Color theory teaches student artists how color affects the human brain, psyche, emotion and eye. Through lecture, multimedia
presentation, and hands-on studio assignments, they learn how color functions with light, computers, and pigment

ART 210 Introduction to Gallery Management 3.0 UNITS
Introduction to Gallery Management introduces students to the hybrid nature of arts-related careers including museum education,
curatorship, arts administration, and operating commercial galleries. Students gain first hand experience in the day-to-day gallery
experience working in the Benjamin J. Dineen, III and Dennis C. Attachment II Hull Gallery and demonstrate the scholarship, production
and marketing skills necessary for the successful creation of an art exhibition and/or sustained gallery program. The material covered
in Introduction to Gallery Management provides students with a general model of how art galleries function as cultural institutions that
collect, display and interpret art and objects. Topics include the history of art display and art exhibition education and students explore
curatorial practice within the vast range of gallery and museum exhibition spaces. The course provides practical experience for students
interested in pursuing a career in the visual arts. As students engage with the course material they also develop and enhance their skills in
visual and verbal literacy, self-expression, creative problem solving, writing, and critical thinking. The course material is complemented by
field trips to museums and galleries in New York and New Jersey. Students will complete independent work as a docent at the Benjamin J

Dineen, III and Dennis C. Hull Gallery for twelve hours over the course of the semester

ART 115 Art History I 3.0 UNITS
Art History Part I traces the development of art from prehistory through the early Renaissance. The course surveys the major developments
in painting, drawing, sculpture, ceramics and architecture through the western canon and provides an introduction to the art of Africa, the
Near East, South and Southeast Asia, China and Japan

ART 116 Drawing II 3.0 UNITS
A continuation of Drawing I, this course will focus on individual development, a thorough understanding of drawing principles and further
the use of drawing materials and techniques. Students are responsible for the purchase of their own supplies

ART 220 Art in Context 2.0 UNITS
ART 220 is a co-requisite course to ART 130 and ARC 280 enables students to identify and research major trends in visual arts and their
cultural and historical context through first-hand experience. Students develop a deeper understanding of the contemporary art world
through increased engagement and familiarity with various New York and New Jersey art institutions. Students visit museums, galleries,
art fairs, artist and design studios, auction houses, conservation studios and attend artist lectures to experience and better understand
contemporary art and the structure of the contemporary art world

ART 117 Painting II 3.0 UNITS
A continuation of Painting I, this course is an advanced studio painting class stressing individual painting skills and personal style. Painting
II focuses on compositional theories and practice, experimentation with mediums, and creative approaches to subjects. Students are
responsible for the purchase of their own supplies

ART 130 Portfolio and Presentation 3.0 UNITS
Portfolio and Presentation will provide student artists with the knowledge and skills to meet both their educational and professional goals

First, student artists will develop a physical and digital portfolio showcasing their best works created at HCCC. This will allow students to
seamlessly enter the third year of any four-year art program. Second, student artists will learn to market themselves to clients, museums,
and galleries. A resume, artists statement, PowerPoint presentation, slide packet and web site will be produced. New technologies will be
stressed along with traditional (non-digital) methods to prepare the student for the professional art world

4 Courses
Courses
ART 120 Survey of Contemporary Art 3.0 UNITS
Survey of Contemporary Art examines the development of the formal and conceptual concerns that have shaped 21st Century art

Distinguished by the absence of a uniform organizing principle or label, contemporary art is a diverse and eclectic combination of subjects,
concepts, materials, and methods. Students explore the notion of what art is and how it can be made through the consideration of ideas,
practices and concepts that are unique to our contemporary world

ART 101 Experiencing Art 3.0 UNITS
This course is designed as an introduction to the Studio Arts for non-art majors. Students will learn through the basic theories and practices
of Art History, Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, and Sculpture

ART 126 Figure Drawing 3.0 UNITS
Student artists will learn to draw the nude and clothed male and female form. Emphasis is placed on scale, proportion, anatomy, expression
and appreciation of the figure

ART 127 Water Color 3.0 UNITS
In this course, students will learn through demonstration and experience how to paint using the medium of watercolor. Students will create
still life, landscape (out of doors, weather-permitting), figurative, and abstract paintings. Students who successfully complete this course
will possess a basic painting kit, a portfolio of watercolor paintings, and the fundamental knowledge and basic skills needed to effectively
use the medium

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE
ASL 101 American Sign Language I 3.0 UNITS
ASL 101 is an introductory course to American Sign Language as it is used within the American Deaf community, as well as an introduction
to Deaf Culture and history. The class will emphasize non-verbal communication as students learn basic vocabulary, sentence structure,
facial expressions, signing parameters and other grammatical markers. Students will start to build basic expressive and receptive skills in
American Sign Language that will be reinforced by a variety of activities

ASL 102 American Sign Language II 3.0 UNITS
ASL 102 is a second level course in American Sign Language as it is used within the American Deaf community, as well as a continuation
of discussion of Deaf Culture and history. The class will emphasize non-verbal communication as students continue to build their sign
vocabulary, sentence-structure, facial expression, and other grammatical markers. Students will continue to strengthen their expressive
and receptive skills in American Sign Language as they engage in conversations that will be reinforced by a variety of activities. Content
from ASL 101 will be continually reviewed and built on in this course

BIOLOGY
BIO 270 Cell Biology 4.0 UNITS
This course is a study of the mechanisms occurring within the cell. It is an overview of the structure and function of eukaryotic cells. It
reviews in depth the organization of the cell plasma membrane and organelles. The physiology of each cell component is further detailed

BIO 260 Molecular Biology 4.0 UNITS
This Course is designed to give students a comprehensive understanding of the function and structure of nucleic acids and proteins in
cells. Students learn various cell signaling pathways including protein transport, protein activation, apoptosis, and cell cycle control in
both Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cells. Students also learn various Molecular Biology laboratory techniques including gene expression,
recombinant DNA technology, Chromosome mapping, Protein and RNA extraction. Attachment
BIO 100 General Biology 3.0 UNITS
This is an introductory course in contemporary biology designed to provide a foundation for further studies in biology. Instructional
techniques include lectures, demonstrations and laboratory

BIO 107 Human Biology 4.0 UNITS
This course focuses on an understanding of the biological functioning of humans. Additional emphasis is given to genetics, ecology and
microbiology. Laboratories include hands-on exercises and lab dissections

BIO 111 Anatomy and Physiology I 4.0 UNITS
This course examines the structure and physiological processes of the human body and provides a background for understanding health
problems, diagnosis, and treatment

BIO 116 Principles of Biology II 4.0 UNITS
This course is a continuation of Principles of Biology I. Students will study the structure, function, and behavior of organisms and the unity
and diversity of life. They will learn about biological organisms and processes and how to correlate new biological concepts with the ones
previously learned. Laboratory exercises will encourage students to practice science through hands-on experiments

Courses 5
Courses
BIO 201 Practical Nutrition 3.0 UNITS
This course stresses the application of nutritional principles to daily health maintenance and conditions that require special diet
management. It is designed for Nursing and Health-related or Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management programs

BIO 208 Ecology 4.0 UNITS
In this course, students will understand the mechanisms governing the structure and function of ecological systems, particularly the
relationship between organisms and the environment. Students will investigate key environment issues such as; global climate change,
acid deposition, loss of biodiversity and genetically modified food

BIO 211 Anatomy and Physiology II 4.0 UNITS
This course is a continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Students will become acquainted with the basic functions, complexities,
and inter-relationships of the components of the human body. Topics will include the circulatory, endocrine, digestive, excretory, and
reproductive systems. Lectures are supplemented by laboratory sessions which will include dissection and elementary physiologic
experiments

BIO 250 Microbiology 4.0 UNITS
This course is geared for individuals entering the medical or health sciences professions. It will encompass a survey of microorganisms with
emphasis on bacteria and applications of microbiology. The laboratory sessions will stress isolation, cultivation, and various biochemical
and identification techniques of selected bacteria and other microorganisms

BIO 240 Genetics 4.0 UNITS
This course examines the principles of inheritance and gene action, from the molecular to the organism level, and populations. Topics
include Mendelian principles, molecular genetics, genetic mapping, population generics, quantitative genetics, gene regulation, mutations,
repair mechanisms, and the modern genetic manipulation

BIO 120 Human Sexual Biology 3.0 UNITS
This non-lab science course is designed for liberal arts and other non-science majors. It gives students the opportunity to discover and
understand the major biological aspects of human sexuality. It focuses on the anatomical and physiological study of the reproductive
system, conception process, pregnancy period, prenatal development and delivery stages, sexual maturation, gender distinctiveness,
and the infectious maladies and specific medical conditions associated with human sexuality. Video simulations in selected topic are
incorporated to reinforce scientific exploration and formulation

BIO 115 Principles of Biology I 4.0 UNITS
Biology is a vast subject that explores all of life, from molecules to ecosystems. Students will acquire a framework of key biological concepts
into which they can fit the many new things they will learn. They will become familiar with the scientific process, in particular, the posing
and testing of hypotheses, and the scientific study of life, evolution, ecology, plants, and animal forms and functions. Laboratory exercises
will encourage students to practice science through hands-on experiments

BIO 230 Histology 4.0 UNITS
In this course, students will recognize the structure and function of cells, tissues, and organs at the microscopic level. They will identify and
recognize all of the major cell and tissue types of the human body. Histology is a laboratory course and lectures often take the form of
slide demonstrations. The lab and lecture will be combined into a single learning experience

BIOTECHNOLOGY
BTN 201 Molecular Biology 4.0 UNITS
This Course is designed to give students a comprehensive understanding of the function and structure of nucleic acids and proteins in
cells. Students learn various cell signaling pathways including protein transport, protein activation, apoptosis, and cell cycle control in
both Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cells. Students also learn various Molecular Biology laboratory techniques including gene expression,
recombinant DNA technology, Chromosome mapping, Protein and RNA extraction. Attachment
BUSINESS
BUS 103 Introduction to Business 3.0 UNITS
This is an introductory course in contemporary business practices. Students develop a basic understanding of key functional areas of
business including management, marketing, finance, economics, accounting and technology. The course focuses on current dynamic issues
facing business such as globalization, entrepreneurship, ethical reasoning and the legal/regulatory environment

BUS 205 Global Business 3.0 UNITS
The course provides a broad overview of international/global Business highlighting the opportunities and challenges multinational
organizations face in today's dynamic environment. Students are introduced to the cultural, economic, political, competitive and legal
environments in which international/global businesses operate

6 Courses
Courses
BUS 299 Business Internship 3.0 UNITS
This course provides the student with on-the-job business experience. The course allows the student to gain supervised practical experience
working in a setting related to the student's area of business interest. Students must successfully complete 225 hours of practical experience
in an approved business workplace. There is an additional lecture component for students to share their experience and discuss lessons
learned

BUS 230 Business Law 3.0 UNITS
Provides a basic knowledge of business law covering the nature, structure and processes of our legal systems and the laws involving
constitutional law, contracts, intellectual property, torts, and product liability. The case study approach will be used extensively, and the
ethical issues in the business environment will also be addressed throughout the course

CULINARY ARTS
CAI 115 Food Sanitation and Culinary Principles 3.0 UNITS
This course introduces students to the principles of conduct and employment in the food service industry, coupled with sanitation
concepts in the operation of a food service establishment. Professionalism, ethics, conduct, and employment opportunities during and
after completion of a degree are discussed. Personal hygiene, fire safety regulations, including state and federal laws pertaining to the
handling of food products are studied. This course prepares students for a nationally recognized ServSafe certification exam provided by
the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF)
CAI 114 Tableservice I 2.0 UNITS
An introduction to the various types of table service styles and settings, including American, French, Russian, banquet, and family style

Emphasis is placed in proper dining room preparations, customer relations, placing and retrieving orders, clearing of tables, and securing
the dining room. Students will also be exposed to the role of the dining room in the overall business plan of the restaurant business. The
course also covers an introduction of wines and wine making

CAI 117 Production Kitchen Skills I 2.0 UNITS
This course is intended to provide a strong foundation in the basic fundamentals of commercial food preparation and practices. Proper
knife skills and the use and care of tools and equipment is demonstrated and practiced in the laboratory. Emphasis is placed with
students using hands-on experience in food production utilizing designed introductory menus. The hands-on experience is supported with
demonstrations and lecture in the laboratory. Students will learn the appropriate cooking methods that may be applied to meats, fish,
poultry, starches, and vegetables. The basic cooking methods are introduced and practiced in the laboratory. Students will also learn the
proper techniques used in the preparation of stocks, soups, and sauces

CAI 118 Pantry and Breakfast Cookery 2.0 UNITS
An introduction to the basic and advanced level of breakfast cookery, including basic egg preparations, breakfast meats, potatoes, quick
breads, batters, various breakfast items, farinaceous and hot and cold cereals. Students will experience short order cooking, and will gain
knowledge of time and temperature in the preparation of various breakfast items. Skills and techniques will be developed in the preparation
of meat products, such as sausage-making, and in the preparation of other breakfast meats. Ethnic and multicultural breakfast foods will
be explored, as well as creative and modern breakfast alternatives. This course also serves as an introduction to the preparation of various
salads, including simple, composed, bound, and hot/cold combinations. Emphasis will be on the preparation of dressings, dips, spreads,
classical and modern sandwich-making, identification and use of salad greens, and fruit preparations

CAI 119 Bakeshop I 2.0 UNITS
An introduction to the preparation of basic quick breads, rolls, breakfast items, and basic desserts, including various icings and butter
cream, puddings, cakes, cookies, and pies. Students will gain skills in the preparation of pie crusts, pie washes, and pie fillings. Emphasis
will be placed on the understanding and use of ingredients, weights and measures, tools, and equipment used in the bakeshop

CAI 124 Tableservice II 2.0 UNITS
An extension and reinforcement of the skills practiced in Table Service I. Emphasis is placed on knowledge of the menu, suggestive selling
techniques, napkin folding, and the use of wines and spirits in the restaurant business. Banquet service will be performed through a
designed and scheduled buffet

CAI 125 Externship I 1.0 UNIT
This is a course designed to provide the student with on-the-job food service experience. The course allows the student to gain supervised
practical experience working in a variety of food-service settings related to the student?s area of interest. Students must successfully
complete 150 hours of practical experience in an approved food-service establishment

CAI 127 Production Kitchen Skills II 2.0 UNITS
A continuation and reinforcement of the concepts and practices of Production Kitchen Skills I. This course exposes the students to more
advanced techniques and applications utilizing different cooking methods. Students will be exposed to a variety of seafood items, as well
as commercial meat cuts used for beef, lamb, veal, pork and poultry

CAI 128 Introduction to Garde Manger 2.0 UNITS
This course exposes students to the preparation of brunch items, fish and shellfish, hot and cold hors d oeuvres, cold canapes, cold
plated entrees, and specialty sandwiches as well as the design of salad bar setups. Basic forcemeat preparations used for pates,
Courses 7
Courses
galantines, terrines, and spreads are practiced in the laboratory. This course also includes the preparations of basic cheese-making, relishes,
condiments and chutneys, including jams and jellies. Students will also prepare various entree salads

CAI 129 Bakeshop II 2.0 UNITS
This course is an extension and reinforcement of the concepts and practices of Bakeshop I. Students will be exposed to a variety of designed
menus to strengthen their skills in the preparation of baked goods. They will also learn how to utilize leftover baked goods to prepare
various products. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of various cake batters and icings

CAI 214 Advanced Tableservice III 2.0 UNITS
The student will gain knowledge of the overall operation of a restaurant, including the training of various techniques and styles of service

Emphasis will be placed on the study of wines from various regions, and the art of pairing wine with food. Hands-on beverage service and
mixology are practiced in the laboratory. French culinary terminology will be integrated

CAI 217 Advanced Kitchen - International 2.0 UNITS
Students will become familiar with the characteristics of various national cuisines, as well as the global interaction of cooking techniques,
equipment and ingredients affecting the modern professional kitchen. Students will prepare a variety of international soups, sauces,
vegetables, starches and entrees from various regions around the world, as well as gaining an understanding of dietary guidelines and
dining habits of numerous regions of the world

CAI 218 Intermediate Garde Manger 2.0 UNITS
An introduction to the preparation of vegetable and fruit carvings, ice sculpturing, aspics, chaud-froid, and timbales through lectures,
demonstrations, and hands-on experience. Emphasis will be placed on the proper techniques of garde manger preparations, terminology,
departmental structure and design, and the use of various equipment and tools. Students are also introduced to the preparation of
marinades, mousses, pickling, canning, pates, forcemeats, galantines, sausages and charcuterie. The techniques, terminology, planning
and design of buffets are also learned and practiced

CAI 219 Advanced Bakeshop III 2.0 UNITS
Students are introduced to advanced pastries, classical desserts, and cake decorations. They will learn various mixing methods, the
preparation of mousses, and advanced piping techniques with an overall emphasis on plate presentation

CAI 224 Advanced Tableservice IV 2.0 UNITS
This course examines the techniques, methodologies and procedures involved in the successful operation of a restaurant. Students will
develop skills in the tableside preparation and service of appetizers, entrees, salads, and desserts. This course will include the perspective on
meeting customer expectations, and the importance of the interaction with guests. The student will gain practical knowledge of structuring
a banquet, and the ability to design and coordinate a buffet. French culinary terminology will be emphasized

CAI 225 Externship III 2.0 UNITS
This is a course designed to provide the student with on-the-job food service experience. The course allows the student to gain supervised
practical experience working in a variety of food service settings related to the student?s area of interest. Students must successfully
complete 300 hours of practical experience in an approved food-service establishment

CAI 227 Advanced Kitchen-Classical 2.0 UNITS
Students will gain an understanding of the historical importance and effect of classical French cuisine on cooking in the 21st century

Emphasis will be placed on the preparation of classical soups, sauces, vegetables, starches, and entrees. In addition, students will examine
contemporary interpretations of traditional dishes and how variations can be introduced and executed in kitchens across each segment
of the foodservice industry

CAI 228 Advanced Garde Manger 2.0 UNITS
This course is structured to provide the student with theoretical and practical experiences in advanced garde manger. Students will also
be introduced to salt sculpturing, cold sauces and dressings, curing and smoking of foods, sushi and sashimi preparations, international
appetizers and hors d?oeuvres, and cheese identification and presentation. Emphasis will be placed on the planning, preparation, design,
and set-up of cold food preparations for a buffet. They will also be introduced to tallow and shortening sculpturing, platter garnishes,
and decorative show platters. Lectures will include off-premise catering, food show rules and regulations, food presentation and platter
arrangement

CAI 229 Advanced Bakeshop IV - Classical 2.0 UNITS
Students will be introduced to classical showpiece mediums, such as nougat, pastillage, chocolate work and advanced cake preparations

The course will focus on the various techniques needed to produce these mediums, along with learning how to prepare a classical dessert
buffet

CAI 223 Food, Beverage, and Labor Cost Control 3.0 UNITS
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the methods, tools, and procedures used to control food, beverage, and labor costs
in a food service organization. Emphasis is placed on each step in the flow of costs: purchasing, receiving, storage, issuing, preparation,
portioning, service and accounting for sales. Labor costs as they relate to the operation are discussed. Active problem-solving and practical
applications are used in class. Basic computer applications of cost-control systems will be introduced. Applied problems in the hospitality
industry will also be included

8 Courses
Courses
CAI 121 Product Identification and Purchasing 3.0 UNITS
This course brings together the four most important foundations in foodservice purchasing: market and distribution systems, storeroom
operations, cost controls, and product identification. In addition, this course covers current issues like security, legal and regulatory
compliance, sustainable agriculture, aquaculture and genetically modified organisms (GMOs)

CAI 210 Menu and Facilities Design 3.0 UNITS
This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of menu development as well as the procedure for designing and building
a foodservice operation. Strong emphasis is given to the consequential interrelationship between the two and is substantiated through
cogent explanation and demonstration. Students develop basic menus for a variety of meal periods based on a learned systemization. The
course examines the tried and true process for designing, building and commissioning a restaurant including space allocation, work and
product flow, facilities engineering, equipment selection and energy practices

CAI 215 Externship II 1.0 UNIT
This is a course designed to provide the student with on-the-job food service experience. The course allows the student to gain supervised
practical experience working in a variety of food service settings related to the student?s area of interest. Students must successfully
complete 150 hours of practical experience in an approved food service establishment

CAI 206 Introduction to Sustainability 3.0 UNITS
This course addresses the costs and ethical implications of utilizing sustainable resources within the hospitality industry. The course
covers alternative energy, recycling, and preservation of our diverse world's resources. World hunger and its ethical impact are addressed

Corporate responsibility in promoting socially-positive consumer behavior is also addressed

CANNABIS
CAN 101 Cannabis Compliance 3.0 UNITS
This course provides basic knowledge of the law and regulations governing the cannabis industry. Students will be instructed on methods
to track good compliance to ensure consumer health and safety and diversion prevention. This course familiarizes students with Metrc-
the NJ State mandated point-of-sale system, which tracks authorized sales, inventory management, and recall operations. Students also
develop a simulated peer-to-peer training session that demonstrates their knowledge of the compliance procedures most common in the
field, combined with their ability to communicate them to regulatory agencies. The course also describes the application processes for
cannabis licenses

CAN 121 Justice in Cannabis 3.0 UNITS
This course provides basic knowledge regarding the roots of cannabis prohibition and its multi-generational impact on our country and
around the world. Students demonstrate knowledge about the global re-legalization efforts surrounding cannabis use. Students effectively
demonstrate knowledge of the social equity programs in the State of New Jersey, among other states

CAN 201 Cannabis Health and Safety 3.0 UNITS
This course introduces the fundamentals of biosecurity, various pests that pose a threat to cannabis production, and products throughout
the entire vertical supply chain. The various insects, microbes, birds and rodents that pose a threat to the production of quality cannabis are
discussed. Students learn about leading integrated pest management theory, workplace sanitation, reporting, and accountability. Students
are introduced to safe-handling procedures and the basics of OSHA

CAN 221 Cannasseur Level I 3.0 UNITS
This course provides students with skills to properly profile strains of cannabis and ability to identify most, if not all the different types
of products offered to consumers, including basic chemical makeup and their effects and side-effects. Students will also learn about the
various production processes and consumption methods

BAKING PASTRY
CBP 211 Meringues, Souffles, and Frozen Desserts 2.0 UNITS
Students will learn how to work with an ice cream machine to create basic frozen desserts, such as sorbets, sherbets, ice creams, and Italian
ices. Techniques to produce meringues and their various applications will be taught. An introduction of hot and cold souffles completes
the course. Prerequisite: CBP 124
CBP 212 Desserts for Restaurant andin Store Retail 2.0 UNITS
This class is designed for students to have an understanding of a different career option available in the pastry arts. The class is divided
into two distinct styles of desserts. The first half of the class will be devoted to learning restaurant and cafe style pastries along with the art
of plating. The second half of the course will cover the mass production aspect of the pastry industry. The focus will be on in-store retail/
bakery style desserts using pre-mixes. Prerequisite: CBP 211
CBP 220 Petits Fours, Mignardise and Candies 2.0 UNITS
The art of working with chocolate, candy making, and petits fours is the emphasis of this class. Students learn chocolate tempering, and will
be able to apply it to create a wide variety of truffles, molded candies and decorations. Students produce popular candies using knowledge
gained in Introduction to Professional Baking. The course also covers the production of mignardise, petits fours, such as sec and glace

Courses 9
Courses
CBP 226 Chocolate and Sugar 2.0 UNITS
Students use classical and current techniques to create a Chocolate, Sugar and Pastillage showpiece. Students learn the elements of
planning, designing and assembling a competition caliper showpiece of their own design. Through multiple techniques inclusive of template
making, casting, sculpting, blowing, pulling, and decorating, students will create a multiple medium showpiece

CBP 225 Advanced Artisanal Bread Baking 2.0 UNITS
The Advanced Bread Baking class is designed for bakers seeking to further their technical knowledge and to refine their hands-on skills
in the art of making artisanal bread. The course offers a complex and detailed examination of the bread baker's art. Content material
focuses extensively on the creation and use of sprouted, whole, and heirloom, flours in the maintenance of sourdough and levain cultures,
as well as the production of sourdough bread using ancient grains. Students produce various breads of both contemporary and ancient
origin. Hands-on time is also devoted to the creation of a decorative bread display. A key focus is on naturally leavened breads that use
ancient grains

CBP 120 Introduction to Professional Baking 2.0 UNITS
This course introduces the basic principles and techniques used in bread baking and pastry arts. It covers: Product identification, proper
use of equipment, measurements, baking terminology along with food costing and storeroom procedures, and demonstrations of mixing
methods for yeast raised breads, cakes, custards, chocolate, sugar and creams are included. Prerequisites: CAI 113, CAI 114, CAI 117, CAI
118, CAI 119
CBP 121 Basic Bench Work 2.0 UNITS
Emphasis will be on various bread mixing methods and their characteristics. Students will learn the relationship between mixing and
fermentation. The understanding of gluten and its importance in the bakeshop will be a key component to the lab. Lean and rich doughs
will be produced using hands-on techniques. Also the craft of artisan breads will be taught using a diversity of pre-ferments and sponges
showing their advantages and disadvantages. Pre-requisite: CAI 119 Co-requisite: CBP 120
CBP 124 Tarts, Tortes and Gateaux 2.0 UNITS
Students will utilize cake mixing methods to create traditional and nontraditional desserts. The use of timeless fillings and icings such as
ganache and Bavarian cream will culminate with the student creating classical desserts such as Linzer Torte, Sacher Torte and Gateau St

Honore. The ever popular cupcake will also be produced showing its versatility in today's market. Prerequisite: CAI 129 and CBP 122; Co-
requisite: CBP 120
CDA-INFANT/TODLER
CDI 100 Infant/Toddler CDA Workshop I 4.0 UNITS
This course introduces students to the Child Development Associate Credentialing process and provides comprehensive instruction in early
childhood education/child development. Students will begin development of a Professional Portfolio and practice strategies for observing
and recording children's behavior. At the conclusion, students will have satisfied 60 hours of the 120 hours of formal training, covering the
six Competency Standards required by the Council for Professional Recognition, which issues the CDA to qualified candidates. Students
are expected to be employed, or to volunteer, either full or part-time, in an Early Head Start program or a child care center, with children
between the ages of birth through 36 months. The course may be applied to the Early Childhood Education programs as a substitute for
ECE 201, Introduction to Early Childhood Education

CDI 110 Infant/Toddler CDA Workshop II 4.0 UNITS
This course helps students expand their knowledge of the Child Development Associate credentialing process and provides comprehensive
instruction in early childhood education/child development. Students will develop skills in planning curriculum for infants and toddlers
and complete the Professional Portfolio. The course offers 60 contact hours of formal training covering the six Competency Standards as
required by The Council for Professional Recognition. Combined with CDI 100, Infant/Toddler CDA Workshop I, students will satisfy the
120 contact hours of formal training, as required by the CDA National Credentialing System. Students are expected to be employed, or to
volunteer, either full- or part-time, in an Early Head Start program or a child care center, with children between the ages of birth through
36 months. The course can be applied to the Early Childhood Education programs as a substitute for ECE 230, Infant/Toddler Curriculum

Prerequisite: CDI 100; Co-requisite: CDI 120
CDI 120 Field Experience Infant/Toddler Setting 3.0 UNITS
Students will be expected to self-place in a licensed Infant/Toddler center, an Early Head Start program or may be observed in their place
of employment. All students will meet once a week for 50 minutes of class time, as well. These 120 hours may be applied to the 480 hours
necessary to apply for the Infant/Toddler CDA Credential. Prerequisite: CDI 100; Co-requisite: CDI 110
CDA-PRESCHOOL
CDP 100 Preschool CDA Workshop 4.0 UNITS
This course introduces students to the Child Development Associate Credentialing process and provides comprehensive instruction in
early childhood education/child development. Students will begin development of a professional resource file and practice strategies for
observing and recording children's behavior. At the conclusion, students will have satisfied 60 hours of the 120 hours of formal training
required by the CDA National Credentialing Program. Students are expected to be employed, or to volunteer, either full or part-time, in a
child care center, preschool, or pre-kindergarten program with children between the ages of 3 and 5. The course may be applied to the
Early Childhood Education programs as a substitute for ECE 201, Introduction to Early Childhood Education

10 Courses

ART 103 Two Dimensional Design 3.0 UNITS Two-dimensional design introduces the organization of visual elements on a two-dimensional plane. The elements of art and concepts of desig nuch amp t, rv lw b x studio problems for the students to explore and solve. Techniques for handling materials will be developed. ART 106 Drawing I 3.0 UNITS

COURSES PDF COURSE LIST BUSINESS ACC 241 Intermediate Accounting II 4.0 UNITS This course is a continuation of Accounting 240, Intermediate Accounting I. It covers Long-Lived Assets, Long-Term Liabilities, Stockholders' Equ it y, F nac lS em P rp o d A s. ACC 121 Principles of Accounting I 3.0 UNITS Previous accounting knowledge is not required.

Default Catalog Header Text BUS BUS 103 Introduction to Business 3.0 UNITS This is an introductory course in contemporary business practices. Students develop a basic understanding of key functional areas of business including management, marketing, finance, economics, accounting and technology.

Manufacturing Processes 3 Credits. Catalog Course Description: This course covers the basic processing methods for metals and woods. Topics include hand tools and power tools, machining, joining, shaping, bending, surface preparation and finishing, Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) and blueprint. ADM-201.

3. This is an introductory course in contemporary business practices. Students develop a basic understanding of key functional areas of business including management, marketing, finance, economics, accounting and technology. The course focuses on current dynamic issues facing business such as globalization, entrepreneurship, ethical reasoning ...

BUSINESS COURSES PDF COURSE LIST. Courses Details: Courses COURSES PDF COURSE LIST BUSINESS ACC 241 Intermediate Accounting II 4.0 UNITS This course is a continuation of Accounting 240, Intermediate Accounting I. It covers Long-Lived Assets, Long-Term Liabilities, Stockholders' Equ it y, F nac lS em P rp o d A s. liberty link hccc

The College holds classes seven days per week between the hours of 8 am and 10 pm. Most College Offices are open Monday through Friday from 9 am to 5 pm and closed on the weekends. During the Summer months (mid-May through mid-August), College Offices are open Monday through Thursday from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm and closed on Fridays and the weekends.

1.5. Business at the Base of the Pyramid. General Management. Michael Chu. Fall. 2022. Q1Q2. 3.0. Business at the Base of the …

Field Course: Arts and Cultural Entrepreneurship (also listed under Marketing and Entrepreneurial Management) Rohit Deshpande. Henry McGee. Spring. 2023. Q3Q4. 3.0. Field Course: HBS Impact Investment Fund (also listed under Entrepreneurial Management and Finance) Archie L. Jones.

DA - Richard J. Daley College. HW - Harold Washington College. KK - Kennedy-King College. MX - Malcolm X College. OH - Olive-Harvey College. TR - Harry S Truman College. WR - Wilbur Wright College. IAI - Course is approved at one or more colleges for the Illinois Articulation Agreement (IAI). GE - Course satisfies a General Educaiton (GE ...

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the core courses of a business degree program?

While different programs might have their own unique versions or names for courses, core classes may include: Business Management. Intro to Economics. Accounting and Financial Management.

What classes do you take in a business school?

While different programs might have their own unique versions or names for courses, core classes may include: Business Management. Intro to Economics. Accounting and Financial Management. Business Administration. Business Law. Professional Communications. Marketing.

What are the different types of business degrees?

Possible specializations within business programs may include management areas (such as project or human resource management), finance, marketing, accounting, entrepreneurship, and others. Your higher-level courses will often depend on what you choose for your area of concentration.

How often is the udemy business course list updated?

We update this list on a quarterly basis. If you need the most current course list, export a list by going to Manage > Course Insights > Export Course List. The Udemy Business content collection includes thousands of courses that are curated from the consumer marketplace (www.udemy.com).

Download Now Error Report

Please leave your comments here:

 

Popular Search

About Us

The display of third-party trademarks and trade names on this site does not necessarily indicate any affiliation or endorsement of librarytemplates.com.

If you click a merchant link and buy a product or service on their website, we may be paid a fee by the merchant.

©2021 Copyrights. All rights reserved. Librarytemplates.com

Newsletter

Subscribe to receive news from us.