Familysearch Catalog At Family Search Sun City Vistoso

Familysearch catalog at family search sun city vistoso

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Summary

FamilySearch Catalog at Family Search.org
Sun City Oro Valley
12 Jan 2021
Getting started—
FamilySearch.org FREE for anyone to use and you need a FREE account
FamilySearch Catalog—formerly known as the FHLC (Family History Library Catalog). The name changed because it
now shows more than just what is at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City

Found under the Search tab
• We will go through all the parts of the screen
o Learn more=Wiki page on using the catalog
o OCLC-if you are looking for a book that has not been digitized and you are not close to the library in SLC, you
can do a search of libraries all over the world and see the nearest library that would carry the book
o ArchiveGrid
o Search by=Place, surnames, titles, author, subjects and keywords
o Search for=Call number, film/fiche number
o Availability=where can it be found, online or at a family history center
SURNAME SEARCH— to see which books have been written about a Surname
• Not a lending library so the books stay there but it is good to know if you are going there on a research trip. The
FHL in SLC is still a wonderful place to visit for a research trip!!
• Example #1—Surname=Baker Author=Sorensen
• Digitized Books are in PDF format so that you can put in a name or place and it will show you all the places in
that book where they are
• Not all books can be accessed online due to the copyright info. There are different access levels. The access level
is displayed in each item’s research results

o Public: The book does not have copyright protections and is available to be viewed online without
restrictions

o Protected: The book has copyright protections and cannot be viewed online

o Full Permission: The book has copyright protections and can be viewed online

o Limited Permission: The book has copyright protections and can be viewed online, but cannot be printed
or downloaded

o Member Permission: You can view it online at the Family History Library, a family history center, or one
of FamilySearch's partner libraries

TITLE SEARCH—If you know the title of a book and want to know if there is a copy

• You do not need to have all the words in a title in the exact order
• Example #1—The Transformation of Virginia
AUTHOR SEARCH—if you know the name of an author and want to see what books are available by that
author
• If you are looking for biographies or autobiographies, put the surname in the author section
• Example #1—Jeffrey Weaver
SUBJECT & KEYWORD SEARCH—both searches are keyword

• Example #1—Occupations way too many better to go to the place and look for occupations
• When you use subject the computer searches for the words you enter, wherever they are found in the subject

You do not need the exact order

• When you use keyword search, the computer searches for entries containing a word or specific combination of
words

• The subjects are based on Library of Congress subject headings. Example of a few: Civil War, Native Americans,
occupations, religions, languages
• Subjects linked to places are called Topics. Topics describe records from or about a place. Examples: History,
Maps, Church Records. Better to use Place search for Topics so that your results are not so numerous

CALL NUMBER SEARCH—To see what books and maps are available
• Very tricky and not too successful
• Case sensitive and must match exactly
• Call numbers are usually 2 lines. To search on both lines using the two lines=type the first line, exactly; press the
space bar, and type the second line, exactly

• Example #1--975.5773 J2k
• Notice it is a physical book and a microfilm

• Do not copy and paste from the catalog into the search box. It will not find a match because the code associated
with that entry in also copied and pasted

FILM/FICHE NUMBER SEARCH--If you know the number of a microfilm or microfiche and want to know what the film or
fiche is and where it is located
• Example #1—lots of pieces of paper or even research logs that have microfilm numbers written but no
description about what it is
Film #2188566 check and see what places have it
DGS-digital batch number and means nothing to anyone but the people who are digitizing the records
Notice there is a small camera which means the images are available to search online
• This helps if the film has not been digitized or is not online and you want to see what FHC has it. Especially
helpful if you are traveling there

• If it has been digitized and is available online, it will give you a link

PLACE SEARCH--default
• U.S.--Search all jurisdictions or levels, starting with the largest to the smallest=federal, state, county, city/town
• Foreign—Country, state or county, parish, town/village—really depends on how a country keeps records. There
will be different ways for different countries. Wiki is a great place to learn how a country kept records

• Be sure to search in the locality at the time of the event. Boundaries changed!!!!
• If there is an index, check those first because they can save you time
• Check records created by a government agency or church first vs. a compiled record
• Places within—because the catalog only uses exact spellings, this is a great way to find a place you are not sure
of its spelling of if the place is even in the state
• Example #1
United States, Illinois=shows the counties going down one level
Cook County
Notes—check to see if those notes give you additional information about the records for the location
Subjects for the county level—Only subjects that are on this level will show
Places within United States, Illinois, Cook County=shows the smaller jurisdictions
Not every smaller place will have records but going to this level will let you know what records are available at
what jurisdictions. IT IS SOOOO IMPORTANT TO GO AS FAR DOWN AS YOU CAN GO!!!! YOU NEVER KNOW
WHAT YOU WILL FIND ON ANY LEVEL

They had no copy machines until the 1960’s. Many handwritten copies were made of records and sent to
different jurisdictions. They probably are NOT exactly alike

• Example #2 Chicago
Vital Records within Chicago
29 choices
Click on the Vital Records to see each one
Add—add anything that looks interesting. It goes into a print list that stays active as long as you are on the
website

Chicago death certificates, 1878-1915
Notice there is a link to the index online. Indexes are good but we ALWAYS want to find the original
Click on here
How to Use this Collection—goes to the wiki page about the collection. Always go to the wiki. It will save you
lots of time and frustration
James Richardson—died 1893
Shows two icons—one is the View the Record Details icon and one is the digital images detail

Remember it is an index and we ALWAYS want to see the original death certificate
The camera shows that there is a digital image of the certificate on a partner website. That is obsolete and can
only be ordered from cook county. When this database was created, they had the images up on FamilySearch
and it was free but then the county realized how much money they were losing and took the images off the
website
Really important to always download an image when you have one because you never know when it might be
taken down

We need to see how we can find the actual certificate. The index shows #57
Go back to the catalog and scroll down on the page. We need to find 7 March 1893
There are 8 pages of film!!! Page 2 where 1893 starts
Find where #57 is. There is a camera icon with a key above it. You can view those images at a family history
center or an affiliate library

It is NOT FamilySearch who decides who sees the images. It is the custodian of the records. FamilySearch would
love for ALL records to be available from the website. Cook County has decided there are two ways you can see
the images—either order directly from them or visit a family history center or an affiliate library

• Example #3=Many record collections have not been indexed. They can create the digitized records faster than
they can index them. They rely on people like you and me to index the records. If you are interested in giving
back to the family history community and to FamilySearch for all the resources they have made available for
FREE, please consider getting involved in indexing records. You sign up at the top pf the page under the Indexing
tab

Ohio
Vital Records
Look for records where the author is a government agency. They are more accurate

Ohio, death certificate indexes (1945-1954) and death certificates (1951, 1953)
Constance Yancy died 1951
Index
To save time--image 1287 of 1315
Not a lot of info
Go to certificate #14004
Back
Check out all the information that was not on the index
• Once we have an image what do we do?
o Source Box
o Attach to Family Tree
o Print
o Download
• Digital image icons—
o Large camera= the images are at a partner website like Ancestry.com, Fold3, etc. If you have a
subscription to that website you will see the image. If you do not, you can see it, for FREE, at a FHC

o Small camera=image is on FamilySearch and can sometimes viewed from home
o Camera with a key above=viewable with additional restrictions—
▪ Access the site at a family history center

▪ Access the site at a FamilySearch affiliate library

o Reel—still only on microfilm

• When you use keyword search, the computer searches for entries containing a word or specific combination of words. • The subjects are based on Library of Congress subject headings. Example of a few: Civil War, Native Americans, occupations, religions, languages • Subjects linked to places are called Topics.

Explore FamilySearch Catalog of Resources — FamilySearch.org FamilySearch Catalog Search the catalog of genealogical materials (including books, online materials, microfilm, microfiche, and publications) made available by FamilySearch online and in libraries and centers worldwide. Learn more about the catalog and how to access materials. Search by:

The following steps will help you find records for a specific locality in the FamilySearch Catalog. Go to the FamilySearch Catalog. ("Places" is the default search option. If it does not appear, select it from the menu.) Type the locality. The catalog organizes places from the largest jurisdiction in a place-name to the smallest. Generally, the ...

Searching the Library Catalog • FamilySearch. FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY ANNOUNCEMENT. The Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, is expanding its hours. Beginning Monday, June 6, our library hours will be as follows: Monday, Friday, and Saturday 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.; and Tuesday – Thursday 9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

FamilySearch Catalog Search the catalog of genealogical materials (including books, online materials, microfilm, microfiche, and publications) made available by FamilySearch online and in libraries and centers worldwide. Learn more about the catalog and how to access materials. Search by: Place Surnames Titles Author Subjects Keywords x Place

Two-Hidden-Secrets-to-Find-a-Ton-More-Results-from-the-FamilySearch-Catalog. Sun City Vistoso Genealogical Society. Oro Valley, Arizona. Skip to content. ... 2021 by Andrea Houston. Click on the link to see a 4 page PDF file with helpful hints to improve your searching in the Family Search catalog. Two-Hidden-Secrets-to-Find-a-Ton-More-Results ...

Nonprofit and free. FamilySearch is an international, nonprofit organization dedicated to helping all people discover their family story. About FamilySearch Donate. Genealogical Society of Utah (now FamilySearch) ca. 1917.

Explore the world’s largest collection of free family trees, genealogy records and resources. Attention: ... Records Images Family Tree Genealogies Catalog Books Wiki. ... Catalog Print List (0) Porter settlements (Sun City, Arizona) - v. 11, no. 2 (summer 1991) Format: Serial Issue Language: English Publication: 1991 ...

This screen shows the complete catalog entry of the title you selected. The Film/Digital Notes contain a description of the microfilm or microfiche numbers. Some family history centers and libraries maintain collections of previously loaned microfilms or microfiche. A camera icon indicates items that are digitally available online.

The FamilySearch Catalog is one of the most important resources when conducting your family history research. The catalog provides you with information about the records, books, microfilm, microfiche, and computer databases available from FamilySearch. To search the catalog, there are eight different types of search options that you can conduct ...

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the familysearch catalog?

The FamilySearch Catalog is the gateway to discover resources at FamilySearch and the Family History Library. Entries in the Catalog include digital images as well as books, microfilm, and other resources. Digital items are marked with a camera icon. For physical items, the Catalog describes where they are located.

How do i find a family history in familysearch?

The FamilySearch Catalog is found at FamilySearch.org under the Search tab. Look for a record by the name of a place (locality) where an ancestor lived. Find family histories (and more) by a particular family name. Locate a record by searching for its title.

Is familysearch free to use?

Nonprofit and free. FamilySearch is an international, nonprofit organization dedicated to helping all people discover their family story. We provide free guidance and resources to help you make more family history discoveries.

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